Business Analysis

Customer Centricity Is Crucial, But It’s Not Enough

Unhappy employee or demotivated at working place.
Image Credit: © Kritchanon — stock.adobe.com #199094610

Many organisations position themselves as being customer-centric, and in doing so consciously put the customer front-and-centre of their decision making.  In a dynamic and competitive business environment, this is a sensible move. In many industries competition is rife and the cost of switching is low, and it may even be possible for a customer to change supplier at the click of a button.  In this type of environment, being efficient whilst also understanding customer needs is of upmost importance.

This thinking, quite logically, permeates into change initiatives too. As analysts, we have a whole range of techniques that allow us to understand customers, put ourselves in their shoes, and create exploratory models.  Perhaps we use elicitation techniques such as focus groups, market research or questionnaires.  Perhaps we develop personas, customer journeys, scenarios and use a range of other techniques that help us to ensure that we’ve fully considered the types of experience that our customers will have.  This is sensible, surely?  I mean nobody would argue against customer centricity, would they?  

It’s About More Than Just Customers 

Interview: Systems Thinking & Pre-Project Problem Analysis

  • Adrian Reed 
  • 1 min read

At the recent Building Business Capability conference, Filip Hendrickx of Altershape recorded a short interview, where we discussed the relevance of Pre-Project Problem Analysis and Systems Thinking for business analysis.

You can watch the recording below, I hope that you find it interesting/useful!



NB: If these topics are of interest, be sure to check out our Pre-project Problem Analysis and Systems Thinking training courses


Project Health Check : 5 serious project warning signs

As experienced change practitioners, I’m sure we’ve all worked on projects that have been difficult.  The unfortunate truth is that some projects gain so much momentum, they become “too big to fail”.  These projects steamroll their way through organisations, and have a tendency to displace anyone that dares to challenge them.

Sometimes when working closely on a project, it is difficult to see the warning signs.  However, it is worth carrying out a project “health check” every now and then, to check for danger signs.  If you see any significant warning signals, then you might need to take some serious (and unpopular) corrective action.  Five such signals are discussed below:

Your project needs a maverick

Project teams are complex and it’s essential that the team works together productively to achieve the end goal.  Every so often, there will be a ‘project maverick’ that upsets the balance. Perhaps they ignore the plan, or escalate an issue straight to the CEO.  Mavericks are often seen as a Project Managers worst nightmare, as… 

The importance of framing a problem correctly

Asking the right questions and framing problems carefully is an important part of project definition and organisational change.  Often organisations frame problems in a way which constricts or constrains potential solutions, and this can lead to a poor outcome or the wrong tactics being employed. Spending time consciously defining a problem can pay dividends in… 

Download free PDF article : “Business Analysis Function – IT or Business Change?”

As business analysts, we are able to add value to a wide variety of projects, whether they are IT projects or pure business change projects. There is an ongoing debate in our profession over where the BA function should sit – whether we should be part of  the IT department, or part of a separate…