The Importance of ‘Thinking Time’

Thinking Time: Clocks in the shape of a human head
Image Credit © freshidea – Fotolia.com #115000680

In the last few weeks, I’ve been listening to a really interesting audiobook.  Entitled ‘Shoe Dog’, it is the autobiography of Nike’s founder Phil Knight.   It’s an interesting story on so many levels, and I was really interested to hear how Nike (or Blue Ribbon as it was then) was reportedly one of the first US shoe companies to partner with a Japanese manufacturer.

 

This was five or six decades ago, long before e-mail, satellite communication links and it was even before fax machines were commonplace.  When working internationally everything took longer—the author describes sending important messages by airmail, or if it was really urgent by telex.  Conversations could take weeks, or even months, and sometimes there was no option but to get on a plane to resolve an issue.   Looking back, this seems like a completely different world.  It is easy to forget that it wasn’t that long ago that the world ran on intra-office (typed) memos, with a typing pool that banged out communications as fast as it could.

 

Ubiquitous Communication

This is a massive juxtaposition with the world we live in now.  We have moved to quite a different extreme where communication is easy.  Communication is ubiquitous.  You can’t blink without finding there are 25 new e-mail messages,  7 new WhatsApp messages, 12 Facebook updates and a whole plethora of LinkedIN connection requests.  And this connected world provides us with so many opportunities; you wouldn’t be reading this blog if the technology didn’t exist.

 

Yet, it has a darker side too.  Over-communication can become a habit—instant messengers set the expectation of an ‘instant’ response.  With easy, cheap communication we are bombarded with interruptions 24 hours a day, and as much as we can switch them off, it is a difficult discipline to do so.  But if we spend so much time communicating, so much time fielding and fire-fighting our multiple inboxes, what do we lose?  And in particular, what does this mean for the quality of decisions that are made in organisations?

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Announcement: BA Conference Europe 2017 — See You There?

As many of you know, I’m enthusiastically believe in the value that good quality Business Analysis can bring, and I love speaking, writing and presenting on this and many other topics! In a break from my normal ‘blog style, I have a very quick update for you.

I’m really excited to announce I’ll be speaking at the BA Conference Europe 2017. My presentation is entitled “Systems Thinking: A Crucial BA Skill in an Uncertain World”

Attending the conference is always one of the highlights of my year, as it provides a real melting pot of ideas. It’s a great place to meet other BAs and exchange knowledge. There are fantastic presentations from real-world practitioners, and there’s also the opportunity to relax and chat over a beer (or two) after the conference has closed. If you haven’t been before, I’d highly recommend taking a look.

Adrian speaking

The conference is being held in London, from 25 – 27 September. You can find full details of the conference here:

http://www.irmuk.co.uk/ba2017/

And if you’re on Twitter, you can keep tabs on the preparations for the conference (and the conference itself) using the #BA2017 hasthag.

I hope to see you there…

Adrian's signature

 

 

 

Adrian Reed
Principal Consultant
Blackmetric Business Solutions


PS — if you can’t make it to London, I’m equally excited to say that I’m speaking at some other fantastic events. I’ll be at the BA Summit Southern Africa in Cape Town  earlier in September. Here are my sessions:

I’ll also be presenting at the Building Business Capability conference in Florida, USA in November:

I’m also presenting an IIBA Webinar on 14th November.  Hope to catch you at one of these events.

[Video] The Indispensable BA and the Surprising Truth: You Work In Sales — Adrian Reed at BA Summit Southern Africa 2016

I’m very pleased to say that my presentation at BA Summit Southern Africa (2016) entitled “The Indispensable BA and the Surprising Truth: You Work In Sales” was recorded.   You can watch the session below, which is around 41 minutes long.  A massive thank you to the conference team for videoing the session, and for providing me with a copy!

 

Here is a brief abstract describing the session:

Business analysis is an essential discipline for organisational success. Our discipline spans not just projects, but also the definition of strategy and much more. As organisations mature, BAs are often seen as internal consultants acting as a liaison amongst stakeholders and our scope for engagement widens.

As this happens, the skill-set and capabilities required by BAs and BA teams subtly shifts. We might not be guaranteed early engagement on every project and proving our worth becomes essential. The art of sales—building awareness and interest in the holistic nature of the consultant analysis services we provide—becomes paramount.

In this presentation, Adrian Reed will explore the importance of softer “sales” skills, avoiding the clichéd “shiny-teeth-and-cufflinks” sales approaches that we all dislike. You’ll hear practical tips including how to:

  • Gain wider engagement for the team by articulating a BA value proposition
  • Sell the benefits of engaging an internal consultant business analyst
  • Foster and manage ongoing stakeholder relationships

If you are interested in the topics discussed in this video, you might find my follow up article “we all work in sales” interesting too.

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