A Mechanic, A Dot-Matrix Printer And Customer Experience

Mechanic with SpannerI have never been particularly interested in cars. I have always taken the view that I want a car that just works  with minimum fuss.  I’ve never been interested in how it works; and although I have some theoretical knowledge of the workings of an engine, I certainly wouldn’t know enough to tune or maintain my car – and for that reason I take it to a local garage to get it serviced, and I try to get any potential problems fixed as soon as I can.

 

The dilemma, for people like me (who know nothing about cars) is deciding which mechanic to take the car to. A quick Google search of local garages in my city finds seemingly hundreds of garages—and all of them appearing very similar.   With very little knowledge of how the car works, how can I be sure they won’t try to charge me for unnecessary work?  How can I be sure that they will do the work safely? Perhaps you’ve faced the same dilemma.

 

Tractor-feed paper and attention to detail

As it happens, I’ve been going to the same mechanic’s garage for years now.  They’ve always been able to help me out, always quote me for any work in advance and always keep their promises.

 

I recently collected my car from the garage, and something that the mechanic did really grabbed my attention.   He printed the sales invoice out on an old dot-matrix printer (using multi-part stationery).  But before handing the paperwork over to me, he tore off the perforated edges of the paper so it is neat.  He then stapled it together, attaching the receipt and added a leaflet with some useful information and the garage’s opening hours. Once everything was assembled he put it in a folder and handed the paperwork over to me in a nicely presented bundle.

 

This attention to detail—on something so seemingly ‘unimportant’ as the invoice—is an almost invisible but potentially important part of the overall customer experience.  Printed documentation clearly isn’t the core service that the garage offers, but it adds re-assurance.  You can imagine a customer thinking:

 

“If they pay that much attention to the presentation of the paperwork, they must be really thorough when they work on an engine!”.

(This is almost the opposite of the coffee stain theory of branding).

 

Of course, attention to detail on paperwork is actually no indication of mechanical thoroughness at all, but it may be perceived as a proxy measure—and customer’s perceptions matter. A lot.  Particularly when there are tens of competitors within a 1 mile radius.

 

Organisations often fall down on these ‘little’ details.  Imagine having a great meal in a restaurant, only to find the bill is wrong and then it takes them 20 minutes to correct it.  You’d feel let down; the smallest of errors has ruined a whole experience.

 

What this means for business analysis

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News: Call for Speakers (BA Conference Europe 2016)

Each year, the BA Conference Europe connects together hundreds of BAs from around the world.  It has grown year-on-year, and this year will be held in September, in London.  The conference is a great place to share knowledge, exchange ideas and meet other BAs.  I really enjoy attending the conference, and it has formed a very useful forum for the BA profession in Europe and beyond.

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