An Unorthodox Catalyst for Innovation: Data

LightbulbNew ideas often arrive at the most inconvenient of times.  As I sit here writing this blog, I’m reminded of the seemingly hundreds of blog ideas that have occurred to me over the past year whilst I’ve been driving my car.  I don’t keep a notepad in the car (as I try to avoid being distracted as I drive), but I always make a mental note to write the idea down when I reach my destination.  Sadly more often than not, I have forgotten it by the time that I arrive.  I am also renowned for waking up in the early hours of the morning, having a fantastic innovative new business idea, but falling back to sleep and forgetting it by morning.  Perhaps you find similar things happen to you too…

 

It seems that ideas and innovation are often triggered by the most surprising of stimuli.  A left-field idea can be triggered by a seemingly unrelated insight.  It’s tempting to think that we are at nature’s mercy, and innovative ideas can only be created by a serendipitous coincidence.  Yet there is much we can do to stimulate innovation – and much has been written discussing the virtues of creative thinking, brainstorming and many other ways of cultivating innovation.

 

Yet, it strikes me, that when we are looking for innovative new ideas we often overlook a real asset that our organisation holds: Data.

 

Before I continue, I should be very clear – I’m absolutely not trying to suggest we should force innovation nor am I underplaying the importance of those happy innovative coincidences that do occur.  However, when organisations need to innovate – and in many industries innovation becomes a pre-requisite for survival – data can be a rich source of inspiration and insight.  We can draw on our data for potential scenarios and ideas for the future.

 

Data as an innovative catalyst

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A Key to Good Customer Experience: Consistency

Inconsistent SignIn a competitive environment, ensuring that our organisations offer good customer service can help create a real competitive advantage.  Understandably, organisations of all sizes—from midsized to multinational—have spent time re-designing their processes and considering the journey that their customers go through when interacting with the company.  Providing a slick, informative and helpful service that meets the needs of our customers will make it more likely that they come back to us.   Customer experience can be examined from many different angles; this article considers the consistency of experience.

 

Offering an experience that is both good and consistent is crucial.  It is extremely frustrating, as a customer, when a company offers an excellent experience one day but a mediocre one the next.   When we provide a great customer experience, it raises the bar; quite rightly, our customers will expect a similar experience the next time.  If we fall short of this in the future, we cause disappointment and frustration. Imagine the following hypothetical example:

 

A supermarket offers a home delivery service.  Week after week, the service works well, with items being delivered on time and as expected.  The driver is always courteous, and helps the customer carry the bags into the kitchen. 

One week, the driver is rushed and unable to help the customer carry their bags into the house (“We don’t actually have to do that…”).  The customer realises, in the rush, that a bag has been missed.  The customer rings the call centre, and after a protracted discussion, the call centre agent issues a refund… but this leaves the customer in a situation where they have to go and visit a supermarket to obtain the missing items, even though they had opted for home delivery.

This inconsistency in experience, if it persists (even occasionally), may convince the customer to change to a different supplier.

 

What this means for business and business analysis

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