The world needs more U-Turns

Motorist with mapI hazard a guess that many people reading this article will own a GPS satellite navigation system (“GPS” or “Sat-Nav“) – I know I certainly do.  I’ve always been very bad at both navigating and driving at the same time, so when driving in an unfamiliar city, I find a GPS sat-nav absolutely indispensable.  Of course, it won’t always navigate to the precise location desired, but it gets very close.

 

I was recently driving around Birmingham, which is a city I visit only very occasionally, and even with automated directions, I managed to drive right past a turning.  My sat-nav (GPS) registered my mistake immediately, and made an announcement that all drivers dread….

 

  “Make a U Turn where possible”

 

With the help of this announcement I quickly realised my mistake, found a safe place to turn, and then I was quickly back on my way.

 

As I was doing this, it struck me how in business the word “U-Turn” seems to have a uniquely negative connotation.  If leaders of organisations or projects make a “U-Turn” this can be seen as embarrassing; it is painted out as a lack of conviction or lack of leadership.  This has an interesting side effect: It can lead to stakeholders stubbornly entrenching themselves into illogical or unsustainable positions, because to be seen to change their view could be a political and organisational nightmare—and this might be seriously career limiting! This pattern happens in organisations of all sizes; whether mid-size, small or multinational.

 

U-Turns aren’t inherently bad

Continue reading The world needs more U-Turns

Start with the outcome in mind

Diverging IdeasA few weekends ago, I caught up with some old friends at a local restaurant.  When the waiter came over, one of our party wasn’t quite ready to order – so I ended up making awkward ‘small-talk’ to fill the conversational void.  As anyone who has ever visited the UK will know, we are often seen as being obsessed by the weather – as that’s what we tend to talk about in situations like this.  So, in full compliance with that cultural stereotype, I went into ‘weather mode’ and commented on how good the weather had been over the past few weeks.  In fact, we’d had a lot of bright sunshine – and I commented on how I hoped that this is a sign of a good summer to come.  The waiter agreed, but added:

 

“Yes, let’s hope for a good summer! Although while we’re holding out for good weather and sun… the farming community will be hoping for rain… I guess only one side will get its wish!”

 

On the face of it, this is a pretty obvious statement, isn’t it?  However, extend this thinking further might lead us to conclude that there are all sorts of viewpoints and communities vying for slightly different things when it comes to weather.  If you own a reservoir, you want enough rain to keep the reservoir topped up.  If you run an outdoor amusement park, you’ll want sun to attract visitors.  If you run a shipping company, you’ll probably be fine with any weather as long as it’s not too windy or too extreme.  Actually all of these things are interlinked (not enough rain in the reservoir is a problem for everyone, and if the ships can’t arrive then we won’t have enough supplies).  There are so many different viewpoints with different perspectives, needs and wants – some of them implicit, some of them explicitly stated.  It’s a complex situation!

 

And this isn’t unique to weather… I bet you see it in your organisation too…

 

What this means for business and business analysis

Continue reading Start with the outcome in mind

Announcement: BA Conference Europe 2014 – See you there?

Adrian speaking

As many of you know, I’m enthusiastically believe in the value that good quality Business Analysis can bring, and I love speaking,writing and presenting on this and many other topics! In a break from my normal ‘blog style, I have a very quick update for you.

 

I’m really excited to announce I’ll be speaking at the BA Conference Europe 2014. My presentation is entitled “The Indispensable BA and the Surprising Truth: You Work in Sales!”

 

The conference is always a highlight of my year, as it provides a real melting pot of ideas. It’s a great place to meet other BAs and exchange knowledge. There are fantastic presentations from real-world practitioners, and there’s also the opportunity to relax and chat over a beer (or two) after the conference has closed. If you haven’t been before, I’d highly recommend taking a look.

 

Adrian speaking

 

The conference is being held in London, from 22 – 24 September. You can find full details of the conference here:

 

http://www.irmuk.co.uk/ba2014/

 

And if you’re on Twitter, you can keep tabs on the preparations for the conference (and the conference itself) using the #BA2014 hasthag.

 

I hope to see you there…

Adrian's signature

 

 

 

Adrian Reed
Principal Consultant
Blackmetric Business Solutions

 


 

PS — if you can’t make it to London, you can also catch me at PAMS Summit in Kraków, Poland on 23rd June or the BBC Conference in Florida, USA on 6th November